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What Content Should Go on Your Home Page?

If you can't grab and maintain interest within a few seconds, most visitors will abandon your site and exit your sales funnel. As the place where a majority of people first enter your site, your home page has a lot of work to do---getting your home page right should be one of your top priorities.

I'm Nick and I have a uncanny obsession with words. I live, breath, and even eat (alphabet cereal) words all day, everyday. You should definitely subscribe because we're going to put out some of the most insightful marketing content you'll ever come across.

Posted on December 12, 2016 in Content

As your website’s receptionist, your home page should be designed to greet visitors, provide them with relevant information as quickly as possible, and then direct those visitors to the rest of your website.

If you can’t grab and maintain interest within a few seconds, most visitors will abandon your site and exit your sales funnel. As the place where a majority of people first enter your site, your home page has a lot of work to do—getting your home page right should be one of your top priorities.

For example Klicker’s home page opening line is “Double Your Leads”. That says allot really fast. A semi smart mind can quickly infer much about our business very quickly and easily.

Improving your home page can be tricky if you don’t know where to start…so let’s start with the basics. Here are 7 pieces of content we think are important for happy, healthy home pages that people WANT to visit.

What You Do and Who You Are

Don’t tell me how silly this is. I visit websites every day where you actually have to dig a little to find out what these businesses do. Anytime you make your visitors work, you’re making a big mistake.

From the nanosecond prospects arrive on your home page, they have to realize exactly who you are and what your biz is all about. A tagline or some kind of big header and catchphrase is great for getting the job done. If you’ve ever watched a commercial where you had no idea what it was advertising, you know how important this step is.

Unique Selling Proposition

Simply put, the step above is the “what” of your home page. This step is the “why.” Your USP tells customers what differentiates you from the competition and why they should choose you instead of the other guys.

Why are you special? Why should people pay attention to you?

Benefits People Will Gain by Working with You

Your business solves problems, and you need to tell people exactly that. Solving problems and relieving pain/stress/other negative emotions is key to selling, and the main reason why prospects are browsing your site in the first place. Tell them, plain as day, exactly how you’re going to make them sleep better at night.

Latest Work and Events

Your company is busy, and making that known to your customers has two benefits.

First of all, it shows transparency and lets your prospects see what you’re up to.

Second of all, it shows that you’re regularly producing content and engaging your audience. People are more inclined to hire you if they see you put effort into your own business.

Social Proof

Testimonials and case studies are powerful social proof, and you should definitely make room for them on your home page.

With that said, caking your home page in testimonials can make it feel too much like a landing or sales page, so use common sense. Your case studies should be absolutely top-notch, too…or they’re going to have the opposite effect.

Balanced Design

Beautiful design and fast loading speeds are both crucial to keep as many visitors on your site as possible and reduce bounce rate. But if you aren’t careful, overloading your home page with too many design elements can cause some web browsers to grind to a halt.

And if you make your visitors wait more than a couple seconds to see your home page, odds are they won’t stick around to see any of your other pages.

Ideally, your site should be easy to clean and modern—you can still deliver incredible design without sacrificing page speed, as long as you don’t overdo it.

Directions

Ideally, visitors to your home page will continue deeper into your site, perhaps to blog posts or (even better) contact forms and sales pages.

Clean navigation bars and menus play a big role in this process, but internal linking and giving clear directions on your home page are also important.

Invite visitors to view a case study, read your latest post, sign up for an email list, contact you for more information, et cetera et cetera…but make absolutely sure you tell them EXACTLY where to go and what to do for each.

Rather than say “get in touch for more info” say something like “just give us your name and email and click that contact button below for more info.” Your home page should have some type of call to action, otherwise it’s not living up to its full potential.

For most companies, you home page is the first impression you get to make on new prospects. Make navigating, reading and loading your home page as easy as possible, and you’ll reap the rewards as visitors continue on to the rest of your site.

Written by

I'm Nick and I have a uncanny obsession with words. I live, breath, and even eat (alphabet cereal) words all day, everyday. You should definitely subscribe because we're going to put out some of the most insightful marketing content you'll ever come across.

Posted on December 12, 2016 in Content